CASE REPORT

Pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for head and neck reconstruction: a case report

Oktahermoniza Oktahermoniza , Ari Oktavenra, Daan Khambri

Oktahermoniza Oktahermoniza
Surgical Oncology Fellowship, Dr. M. Djamil Hospital, Universitas Andalas, Padang, West Sumatera, Indonesia. Email: [email protected]

Ari Oktavenra
Surgical Oncology Fellowship, Dr. M. Djamil Hospital, Universitas Andalas, Padang, West Sumatera, Indonesia

Daan Khambri
Surgical Oncology Consultant, Dr. M. Djamil Hospital, Universitas Andalas, Padang, West Sumatera, Indonesia
Online First: April 24, 2021 | Cite this Article
Oktahermoniza, O., Oktavenra, A., Khambri, D. 2021. Pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for head and neck reconstruction: a case report. Bali Medical Journal 10(1): 164-166. DOI:10.15562/bmj.v10i1.2112


Introduction: Cancer surgery in the head and neck area generally causes a wide defect and usually cannot be closed primarily or by using the surrounding tissue, thus a flap is needed. There are several types of flaps, namely local flaps, pedicle flaps, and free flaps. Although the free flap is currently the gold standard for reconstruction of the head and neck in developing countries, the resources for a free flap in most healthcare center are still lacking, as well as the large number of patients with poor economic and nutritional status. Thus, the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) remains popularly used.

Case Description: A 46-year-old male patient with squamous cell carcinoma in the neck area, underwent wide excision procedure and the surgical defect was reconstructed with a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap.  The results of reconstruction with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap were viable, and were functionally and aesthetically acceptable. There are no postoperative complications such as hematoma or abscess observed.

Conclusion: Pectoralis major myocutaneous flap was one of the main and easy to learn modalities for head and neck reconstruction surgery and it was acceptable functionally and aesthetically in situations where free flap could not be performed for one or many reasons.

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